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Former Amana restaurant home to new trio of food-related businesses

Tastings, Serena's Coffee Cafe and a noodle factory

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Gazette Staff/SourceMedia  ::   UPDATED: 21 January 2014 | 3:14 pm   ::  

AMANA — It’s not the manufacturing plant that the founder of a German noodle company envisioned. But ALB-GOLD Noodle Shop will introduce the company’s products to Eastern Iowa residents and visitors to the Amana Colonies.

ALB-GOLD Noodle Shop is one of three food-related businesses located in the Old Brick House Market, 728 47th Ave. in Amana. ALB-GOLD, Serena’s Coffee Cafe and Tastings marked their grand opening Friday in a remodeled building that formerly housed the Brick Haus restaurant until it closed in late December 2009.

Klaus Freidler selected Amana as the location of a North American ALB-GOLD plant following a cross-country tour that took him initially to Des Moines and Cedar Rapids. When the economic recession hit in 2008, plans for the noodle plant and an adjacent Bionade beverage factory were put on hold.

In July 2010, Klaus Freidler suffered a fatal heart attack. Wanting to continue the family-owned company’s relationship with the Amana Colonies, Irmgard Freidler, Klaus Friedler’s widow and ALB-GOLD chief executive officer, and her son, Andre, its chief operating officer, traveled to Amana in July 2011 looking for the right location for a noodle shop.

“That was exactly the time that Yana and David (Cutler) purchased the building and were changing it from a restaurant to a retail place,” Andre Freidler said. “Yana told us of her vision to have Tastings as a shop for specialty foods, and combined with Serena’s Coffee Cafe, it was the perfect location for our business.”

ALB-GOLD makes more than 160 varieties of noodles, including organic noodles. The company has a close working relationship with its suppliers, allowing it to track eggs, wheat and other ingredients back to the original source.

“It was a philosophy of my husband that we carry on,” Irmgard Freidler said. “He said people want to know where their food comes from and we open our factory to show people how we make our noodles.”

- By George Ford

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